İskur - How does mass production in Clothes works in Kaharmanmaras?

Mass production is ruling the fashion industry. In Kahramanmaraş I visited one of the biggest producing companies of Turkey - İskur, who produces for Lacoste, S.Oliver, Otto Group, H&M, sometimes Primarkt/Pennys and Boyner. It is with 3000 people (260 of those in the garment sector) one of the biggest and most successful companies in the mass production.

 

When I arrived at İskur I looked at a surprisingly quite normal brown factory house. I entered, I walked through a little hallway with two or three offices and met Hakan Kalinkütük, the Marketing Manager of  İskur. He opened another door in the back and ssssssuuuuuuummmmm

We entered a hall of buzzing sewing mashies.

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Hakan Kalinkütük tuck me to the other end of İskur factory and said that is where it starts. So here the different steps of clothes mass production: 

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#Materials

Every piece of clothes starts with the fabric. The most popular fabric in mass production of clothing is cotton. In Turkey there is growing cotton. Still after 1990 when the Oil became more popular, most of the cotton in Turkish clothes productions were imported from the US - because there are bigger fields with big, modern machines (one machine has actually the size of the a hut or a small house), which makes them more efficiently and cheaper compared to the relatively small fields in Turkey worked on with old machines or even hand picked cotton. Still, climawise Turkey would be perfect to grow cotton.

At İskur fabrics are only stored with an incoming order, that saves stocking costs. The company itself started in 1988 as a spinning factory and produces today 4 tons each month.  5% of this are used for their own yarns. The rest of produced fabrics are sold to low level productions.

 

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#TheCut

Cutting produces a lot of loss on in materials. To be more efficient in that part mashies calculate the cutting to minimize the waste of material.

If you look at this from the point of pollution of clothes waste, this a very good innovation. If you see it from the artificial point of you probably call it a pity.

By the way in some factories in India sewer get payed with those left overs in clothes production, which is also why you can find so many blankets on Indian markets.

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#ThePrint

Printing is still mostly done in a manufacturer work order, even though printing can be done by computers and laser. But this becomes effective at such a high demand on clothes that it is less used. Specially because most labels tent to make "mini collections". Fast Fashion brands like H&M produce such mini collections every week. And trends in Fashion tend to more individualism - so a small number of the same shirt supports the thinking of uniqueness - in wiered way, because Hakan told me that most of the brands go shopping and look which pieces sell best and copy designs.

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#TheSewing

Sewing is the essential work which is talked about when it comes to fair/not fair working conditions. İskur is a very modern factory. As usual in the sewing part of factories, every worker has to care for sewing one part of a shirt (likewise only sewing shoulder parts) and works in a line with 10 to 15 other workers sewing the next parts. That's the most efficient way to do it - any economist will know, that is just following the Smith Law of labour step diversity.

Quality differences are measured in time. While the Lacoste pays more to let shirts produce in a longer time with more controls, S.Oliver pays for a quicker production, which means every worker has less time for one shirt and of course they also save time on controls on the sewing in between.

At İskur 1000 shirts get produced daily in six lines, 220.000 pieces each month. Orders generally take 8 weeks, but can be done in 4 weeks.

Time is the main pressure on workers in poorer and more dependent countries like India or Bangladesh. But also in Turkey - specially Istanbul where most clothes productions of Turkey takes place. The fake brands are still popular in Turkey and have a price range of 1-10 Euro in selling. It's a high demand but too much concurrents in the Istanbul market who are willing to work for less and that let Istanbul face problems like bad payment, bad conditions for workers and child labor of mostly Syrian refugee kids. "Who can make more for less in shorter time" also became a business concept for companies like Primak and others, who give their orders alwaysto different producing factories, always the one, which make it for the best price.

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#TheLabel

The Label is the one thing which make one shirt different from another in being an original or fake.

Labels like Lacoste are very strict in their Label policies - and they have to. From the marketing point of view the Label is the promise of quality, which justify the price.

Labels like the Lacoste crocodile get produced separately and are delivered counted to the clothes production - if one Label gets lost the factory has to pay each with more than 20€ back to the brand.

The machine for making labels like the Lacoste crocodile is actually the most expensive machine at the İskur factory - it is a fine sewing machine for 30.000€.

 

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#Cost&Location

Karamanmaraş is south east of Turkey, not far from the Syrian border and belongs to one of the regions, which get governmental support. Clothes production in Karhamanmaraş is about 20% cheaper then İstanbul. 30-45% of the working costs are paid back to the factories, same with the used energy and electricity costs where 15% will be paid back to the factories.  Still location matters. Istanbul is located close to Europe and has a harbor. Lacoste production market is based with 50% in Istanbul and uses places like Karhamanmaraş to outsource resources.

So but what is production price and what's selling price?

For example one shirt of S.Oliver is produced for 2€ at İskur and sold for 16€ by S.Oliver.

But the price on the Label becomes less and less the price with which is calculated in business concepts - most of the clothes are sold in discounts with up to 70% and the rest is going to outlet centers, where mostly the pieces of more unpopular sizes land.

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So if you look at mass production in general it is less about the price (which seems a changeable number in matter of time) it is more about time. The time a piece needs no get produced sets the most pressure for anyone working in the value chain of Fast Fashion. To me it seems as if you really want to bring money to the person who sew your clothes, then you have to pay that person him/herself.